+ The connections between sexual violence and feminism’s toxicity | The Feminist Wire

“If you want to know the future of online feminism, you have to know its past. Since no one has produced a comprehensive history yet—publishers, call me!—the void has been filled with false starts and near misses, most of which do little more than fan the flames of an already well-fueled inferno. Claims about online feminism’s toxicity often conflate the medium with the message, blaming technology and ignoring context completely. But conflicts over silencing and exclusion have existed throughout feminism’s history, and the Internet is the latest platform for these arguments to play out. In reimaging a feminist praxis that centers inclusion and accountability, we might find value in looking to other models of transformation, such as those created to enable survival and healing.

Dear Sister: Letters from Survivors of Sexual Violence is a collection of confessions and contemplations that bear witness to the experience of being torn down and the work of building back up. While the focus is on providing support for sexual violence survivors, the book also exemplifies the coexistence of conflicting voices as complimentary not competing. It establishes a framework that allows for deconstructing, yet pushes the deconstruction to produce value beyond simple critique.

I find the parallels between sexual violence and feminism’s toxicity to be abundant and striking. Both are systematically embedded to the point of invisibility. Both are hell bent on annihilation. And both require the deep, scary, and sustained work of community accountability. The first step is learning how we got here. The next is a leap of faith.”

The connections between sexual violence and feminism’s toxicity | The Feminist Wire

“If you want to know the future of online feminism, you have to know its past. Since no one has produced a comprehensive history yet—publishers, call me!—the void has been filled with false starts and near misses, most of which do little more than fan the flames of an already well-fueled inferno. Claims about online feminism’s toxicity often conflate the medium with the message, blaming technology and ignoring context completely. But conflicts over silencing and exclusion have existed throughout feminism’s history, and the Internet is the latest platform for these arguments to play out. In reimaging a feminist praxis that centers inclusion and accountability, we might find value in looking to other models of transformation, such as those created to enable survival and healing.

Dear Sister: Letters from Survivors of Sexual Violence is a collection of confessions and contemplations that bear witness to the experience of being torn down and the work of building back up. While the focus is on providing support for sexual violence survivors, the book also exemplifies the coexistence of conflicting voices as complimentary not competing. It establishes a framework that allows for deconstructing, yet pushes the deconstruction to produce value beyond simple critique.

I find the parallels between sexual violence and feminism’s toxicity to be abundant and striking. Both are systematically embedded to the point of invisibility. Both are hell bent on annihilation. And both require the deep, scary, and sustained work of community accountability. The first step is learning how we got here. The next is a leap of faith.”

Posted 4 days ago by elevatedifference.
I’m always happy to discover a piece I wrote has been republished, but I was even more thrilled to see my interview with writer and scholar Mary Gray at the Institute for Southern Studies. ICYMI, go read Moonshine and Rainbows: Queer, young and rural to disabuse yourself of the notion that small town America is inherently hostile to LGBT communities.

I’m always happy to discover a piece I wrote has been republished, but I was even more thrilled to see my interview with writer and scholar Mary Gray at the Institute for Southern Studies. ICYMI, go read Moonshine and Rainbows: Queer, young and rural to disabuse yourself of the notion that small town America is inherently hostile to LGBT communities.

Posted 5 days ago by elevatedifference.
Why Good Intentions Aren’t Enough | Herizons Magazine

“When Tori Hogan was 20, she visited a refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya on an internship. One day, her desire to be an aid worker was brazenly called to task. ‘If the aid projects were effective, we wouldn’t still be living like this after all these years,’ a 14-year-old Somali refugee told her. ‘Do you really think you have the answer to our problems?’ Hogan would later realize that the answer was ‘no’.”

Why Good Intentions Aren’t Enough | Herizons Magazine

“When Tori Hogan was 20, she visited a refugee camp in Dadaab, Kenya on an internship. One day, her desire to be an aid worker was brazenly called to task. ‘If the aid projects were effective, we wouldn’t still be living like this after all these years,’ a 14-year-old Somali refugee told her. ‘Do you really think you have the answer to our problems?’ Hogan would later realize that the answer was ‘no’.”

Posted 1 month ago by elevatedifference.